Jaro Jelovac


Using clean strokes, Jaro creates surreal worlds. His rich symbolism defies logical analysis, allowing a glimpse into the deviate evolution taking place in a parallel reality. Parts of various beings, independent or united into a single body, may appear impossible to the human mind, but in the world of the artist they arise from one another and coincide homogenously. They live according to their own rules on the meaning of existence, which place in the forefront the experimental construction of creatures the human world limits to such extremes.
 

The attempt to disconnect from reality tests the interpretative capabilities of human imagination. Parallel evolution follows the principles of similarity and word games. The likeness between entities (visual or functional) causes their metamorphosis and subsequent replacement. In this way, new and new “monsterpieces” are born, fingers are transposed with horns or legs, legs with tentacles, extremities with eyes. Nothing is impossible in this context, a body may for example function without legs, it may grow wings and disconnected power lines, cats wear horns while worms gain sight and, as the most intelligent of all monsterpieces, speak out.
 

According to the principles of evolution some achieve supremacy, become independent, assume certain symbolic meanings, or become a connective or constituent element of other illustrations (tentacles, eyes, worms). In this fashion, tentacles instill a sense of manipulative and omnipotent power, in the later stages of development overturning the all-seeing eyes that appear in worms as well. Under their supervision functions the factory of new monsterpieces, from among which several attain the status of singularity and are granted names, while others appear serial, recurring (f.ex. wings, Fingersnail). In the parallel world, humans have a static role. Their faces are dark or distorted, actually necrotic, as imaginary creatures have infested them and are now in control.
 

The world of monsterpieces is generated in infinite ways. Jaro focuses on the exploration of their capacities and demands a shift into a different mode of thinking from the observer. The symbolism of the illustrations and the search for possible interpretations do not require an anchor in actual human experience. Above all, the intuitive plane of fantastic and imaginary structures reigns therein, carrying the observer far beyond the boundaries of perception into surreality itself.

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